Kouassi Leaves Quietly By The Side Door

Fisiani

Well-known member
It's a fact of life, that moving to another country is difficult, at first
Some can handle it, some can't, it affects their their everyday life, and subsequently their performance, attitude at training, and in games
In spite of what players from other countries, have done in their own leagues, playing for Celtic, living in Glasgow, Scotland for that matter is a different prospect to what they've been used to in their homeland
It's tough coming to a place, where sometimes, the language, and culture, even the cuisine, can make life hard, no matter the lifestyle you're gong to be offered
I know one young guy in North America, who was invited to Celtic Park on trial, he did well, and the club wanted to sign him, he was torn, but he was homesick, missed his family and friends, and decided to return home
Great player, but he missed his family and friends, some people chastised him for giving up the opportunity, those are the kind of people who would never be given the opportunity, in the first place
I understood, from his standpoint, he's thousands of miles from home, different environment and even though he could speak the language, it was tough on him
Imagine not being able to speak the language and make an impact, with the pressure of being at a legendary club
Good luck to the Bhoys who move on
It's a business, and if the club can bring in someone they think they can make a profit on, they'll do it
Stay safe everybody
HH
Homesick and language problems are terms that we use instead of calling it symptoms of mental health problems. Such psychological problems are however still sadly ignored or stigmatised by some. Football players of course can and do develop anxiety and depression and grief just like any other people and yet while we have excellent physios and medics who can treat a groin strain or a rolled ankle I wonder if we put the same skill into maintaining and strengthening players mental health. A player can have great skill and talent but mental health problems will obviously limit his ability. Leigh Griffiths inability to play for many months was a prime example. That was just the tip of the iceberg however. Scotland has some very excellent mental health professionals who could surely help the club if they were asked. It is much easier to promote mental health than to treat mental illness. Think of like a mental shinguard to prevent bruising. Shinguards do not work at all after the bruise. Marcus Aurelius once said "our life is what our thoughts make it" . I agree.
I would propose that Celtic find a top local clinical psychologist to draw up a psychological profile of every staff member to identify their mental health risk factors and possible mitigation strategies. I would also propose that every staff member be rostered to have a regular monthly one hour meeting with a top psychologist to ventilate their fears and problems in a prophylactic way rather than wait till they are grossly impaired and be sent for help. No opting out. I set up such a system at a health centre more than 20 years ago and it was a very successful trial. I would suspect that Neil Lennon and John Kennedy who have each faced mental health crises in the past would be supportive.
5, 4, 3, 2, 1 let the anti-mental health brigade bigots spew their predictable bile
 

boab1916

Well-known member
Homesick and language problems are terms that we use instead of calling it symptoms of mental health problems. Such psychological problems are however still sadly ignored or stigmatised by some. Football players of course can and do develop anxiety and depression and grief just like any other people and yet while we have excellent physios and medics who can treat a groin strain or a rolled ankle I wonder if we put the same skill into maintaining and strengthening players mental health. A player can have great skill and talent but mental health problems will obviously limit his ability. Leigh Griffiths inability to play for many months was a prime example. That was just the tip of the iceberg however. Scotland has some very excellent mental health professionals who could surely help the club if they were asked. It is much easier to promote mental health than to treat mental illness. Think of like a mental shinguard to prevent bruising. Shinguards do not work at all after the bruise. Marcus Aurelius once said "our life is what our thoughts make it" . I agree.
I would propose that Celtic find a top local clinical psychologist to draw up a psychological profile of every staff member to identify their mental health risk factors and possible mitigation strategies. I would also propose that every staff member be rostered to have a regular monthly one hour meeting with a top psychologist to ventilate their fears and problems in a prophylactic way rather than wait till they are grossly impaired and be sent for help. No opting out. I set up such a system at a health centre more than 20 years ago and it was a very successful trial. I would suspect that Neil Lennon and John Kennedy who have each faced mental health crises in the past would be supportive.
5, 4, 3, 2, 1 let the anti-mental health brigade bigots spew their predictable bile
Mate your skills are wasted on here, Castle Grey Skull over in Ibrox is gonna be looking for a shrink when the ten hits the fan.
 

DILLIGAF

Well-known member
Who knew that all those decades ago, when I emigrated
Instead of feeling stressed, due to what I thought, was homesickness, missing my family, friends, and familiar surroundings, what I actually had, was a mental illness
If only I had sought out the help of a mental health professional instead
:oops::rolleyes:
 

kelly

Well-known member
Who knew that all those decades ago, when I emigrated
Instead of feeling stressed, due to what I thought, was homesickness, missing my family, friends, and familiar surroundings, what I actually had, was a mental illness
If only I had sought out the help of a mental health professional instead
:oops::rolleyes:
Same happened to me each country i landed in while outwardly i was enjoying taking in new surroundings meeting new people making friends and learning different cultures ,moving homes buying cars going dirt biking in the rockies and bangin some really hot burds it was all a facade

what should have been portrayed was misery , a longing to be wanted ,abandonment issues and let's face it we all need a bit of mental health issues to top it all off even if it isn't in the diagnoses

and to think i could have saved myself from all that shite if only i had shut the door and sat in the corner
 

Bigian65

Well-known member
Homesick and language problems are terms that we use instead of calling it symptoms of mental health problems. Such psychological problems are however still sadly ignored or stigmatised by some. Football players of course can and do develop anxiety and depression and grief just like any other people and yet while we have excellent physios and medics who can treat a groin strain or a rolled ankle I wonder if we put the same skill into maintaining and strengthening players mental health. A player can have great skill and talent but mental health problems will obviously limit his ability. Leigh Griffiths inability to play for many months was a prime example. That was just the tip of the iceberg however. Scotland has some very excellent mental health professionals who could surely help the club if they were asked. It is much easier to promote mental health than to treat mental illness. Think of like a mental shinguard to prevent bruising. Shinguards do not work at all after the bruise. Marcus Aurelius once said "our life is what our thoughts make it" . I agree.
I would propose that Celtic find a top local clinical psychologist to draw up a psychological profile of every staff member to identify their mental health risk factors and possible mitigation strategies. I would also propose that every staff member be rostered to have a regular monthly one hour meeting with a top psychologist to ventilate their fears and problems in a prophylactic way rather than wait till they are grossly impaired and be sent for help. No opting out. I set up such a system at a health centre more than 20 years ago and it was a very successful trial. I would suspect that Neil Lennon and John Kennedy who have each faced mental health crises in the past would be supportive.
5, 4, 3, 2, 1 let the anti-mental health brigade bigots spew their predictable bile
πŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆ FFS efter reading that come back THAI TIM eejit πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
 

Fisiani

Well-known member
Homesickness Dill is a form of Grief due to the perception of loss and failure to see what we still have. It is not however inevitable in all emigrants. That's the important aspect. Some manage to find a different perspective. Mental health professionals can usually speed up that healing process. I hope you have fully recovered from it. Dis-ease is the lack of being at ease. Mental health problems are common but usually resolvable.
 

Bigian65

Well-known member
Homesickness Dill is a form of Grief due to the perception of loss and failure to see what we still have. It is not however inevitable in all emigrants. That's the important aspect. Some manage to find a different perspective. Mental health professionals can usually speed up that healing process. I hope you have fully recovered from it. Dis-ease is the lack of being at ease. Mental health problems are common but usually resolvable.
Your up early ICKE man ffs am aff tae ma bed fuckin mental cuntπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
 

DILLIGAF

Well-known member
Homesickness Dill is a form of Grief due to the perception of loss and failure to see what we still have. It is not however inevitable in all emigrants. That's the important aspect. Some manage to find a different perspective. Mental health professionals can usually speed up that healing process. I hope you have fully recovered from it. Dis-ease is the lack of being at ease. Mental health problems are common but usually resolvable.
Thank you for your concern, I think I am over any anxiety, that I may have once had
And I sincerely hope, that your own personal health/mental health issues, are being dealt with
Perhaps you know someone who is a specialist in that, which ails you
May one inquire as to how long you have lived in Silver Fern country ?
I have several friends, who are Kiwis, and they are terrific people
In fact, a few years ago, the All Blacks dined at a friend of ours restaurant, and ate everything on the menu
May your deity look down on you kindly
'D'
 

The Shamrock

Well-known member
Homesickness Dill is a form of Grief due to the perception of loss and failure to see what we still have. It is not however inevitable in all emigrants. That's the important aspect. Some manage to find a different perspective. Mental health professionals can usually speed up that healing process. I hope you have fully recovered from it. Dis-ease is the lack of being at ease. Mental health problems are common but usually resolvable.
If that was true about mental health illnesses usually being resolvable then I would be signing on, so I beg to differ.
 

Warriorthruandthru

Well-known member
The secret of turning lead into gold has eluded mankind for centuries. In the world of sport converting youth talent into senior stars is the equivalent task. While some are better at it than others there is no guaranteed formula.
Graduates of the Ajax youth academy are all technical proficient and some go on to have stellar careers but many fail to make the grade or flash and burn without ever reaching their true potential.
The SPFL has been littered with guys who have never quite made the grade at Celtic but who have had solid journeyman careers in Scottish football. The difference between making it and not making it is negligible. Pro sport is brutally ruthless and when the chaff is discarded some excellent quality wheat often goes out the door with it.
Whoever comes up with a guaranteed formula for success will be a wealthy person.
 

Lubos left peg

Well-known member
The secret of turning lead into gold has eluded mankind for centuries. In the world of sport converting youth talent into senior stars is the equivalent task. While some are better at it than others there is no guaranteed formula.
Graduates of the Ajax youth academy are all technical proficient and some go on to have stellar careers but many fail to make the grade or flash and burn without ever reaching their true potential.
The SPFL has been littered with guys who have never quite made the grade at Celtic but who have had solid journeyman careers in Scottish football. The difference between making it and not making it is negligible. Pro sport is brutally ruthless and when the chaff is discarded some excellent quality wheat often goes out the door with it.
Whoever comes up with a guaranteed formula for success will be a wealthy person.
The formula is easy......we should only sign catholics. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
 

The Shamrock

Well-known member
The secret of turning lead into gold has eluded mankind for centuries. In the world of sport converting youth talent into senior stars is the equivalent task. While some are better at it than others there is no guaranteed formula.
Graduates of the Ajax youth academy are all technical proficient and some go on to have stellar careers but many fail to make the grade or flash and burn without ever reaching their true potential.
The SPFL has been littered with guys who have never quite made the grade at Celtic but who have had solid journeyman careers in Scottish football. The difference between making it and not making it is negligible. Pro sport is brutally ruthless and when the chaff is discarded some excellent quality wheat often goes out the door with it.
Whoever comes up with a guaranteed formula for success will be a wealthy person.
Very true Warrior but I've always been aware of how much luck can play a big part in pro sport. Different managers see different things in players as do the coaching staff etc and that can make a huge difference to any player's career.
 

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