No sport.. so what you guys watching?

Richybhoy

Well-known member
I found these when snooping about the internet

(3) Nick Hazlewood, In the Way! Goalkeepers: A Breed Apart? (1996)
More than 80,000 were at Ibrox to witness an event that has remained imprinted on the Scottish football psyche ever since. With the second half barely five minutes old, Rangers striker Sam English broke free and lined up to shoot from near the penalty spot. He seemed certain to score, when Thomson launched one of his do-or-die head-first saves at the attacker's feet. It was Thomson's trademark save - in February 1930 against Airdrie he'd been injured doing exactly the same thing, fracturing his jaw and injuring his ribs. This time there was an even more sickening crunch, Thomson's head colliding with English's knee at the moment of greatest impact. It was no longer a do-or-die moment, it was a do-and-die. The ball ran out of play, English fell to the ground and rose limping, Thomson lay unconscious, blood seeping into the pitch.
The dazed English was the first to realise the seriousness of the blow and hobbled over to the unmoving keeper, waving urgently for assistance. Celtic fans were cheering the missed goal, Rangers fans were taunting the injured keeper, but the gravity of the situation was soon upon them. Rangers' captain Davie Meiklejohn raised his arms to implore the home fans to be silent. A hush descended over the ground. In the stands Margaret Finlay, Thomson's fiancee, broke down as she saw him borne from the ground, head wrapped in bandages, body limp...
What followed was an outpouring of public grief that, it is said, briefly united communities across the sectarian divide. In Bridgeton, Glasgow, traffic was brought to a halt by thousands of pedestrians walking past a floral tribute to Thomson, placed in a shop window by the local Rangers supporters club. And at Glasgow's Trinity Congregational Church there were unruly scenes when thousands struggled to get into Thomson's memorial service. Women screamed with alarm at the crush and only swift action by police cleared a passageway and stemmed the rush. Celtic right-half Peter Wilson, who was due to read a lesson, failed to gain entrance and found himself stranded outside the church for the ceremony.
Tens of thousands went to Queen Street station to see the coffin off on its train journey home to Fife. Many thousands more made the same journey: by train, by car and by foot. Unemployed workers walked the 55 miles, spending the night on the Craigs, a group of hills behind Auchterderran. In Fife, local pits closed down for the day and it seemed as if the whole of Scotland had swelled the small streets of Cardenden. Thomson's coffin, topped by one of his international caps and a wreath in the design of an empty goal, was carried by six Celtic players the mile from his home to Bowhill cemetery, where he was laid to rest in the sad and quiet graveyard populated by the victims of many, many mining disasters.
(4) Willie Maley, quoted in James Hanley's, The Story of the Celtic: 1888-1938 (1960)
Among the galaxy of talented goalkeepers whom Celtic have had, the late lamented John Thomson was the greatest. A Fifeshire friend recommended him to the Club. We watched him play. We were impressed so much that we signed him when he was still in his teens. That was in 1926. Next year he became our regular goalkeeper, and was soon regarded as one of the finest goalkeepers in the country.
But, alas, his career was to be short. In September, 1931, playing against Rangers at Ibrox Park, he met with a fatal accident. Yet he had played long enough to gain the highest honours football had to give. A most likeable lad, modest and unassuming, he was popular wherever he went.
His merit as a goalkeeper shone superbly in his play. Never was there a keeper who caught and held the fastest shots with such grace and ease. In all he did there was the balance and beauty of movement wonderful to watch. Among the great Celts who have passed over, he has an honoured place.
 

Maestro

Well-known member
Coz I'm a degenerate muthafucker, I completely agree and understand nobody would listen or take advise from a person who volunteer's for house arrest on a daily basis, I have to not only implore time but impress the essential requirement for everyone to gread William Maleys The Story Of The Celtic ๐Ÿ€
It is essential for everybody who even brushes across Celtic in their lives!

50 years manager of Celtic Football Club... if you don't read, you don't know, FLY THE FLAG!


GBTC๐Ÿ€
 

Maestro

Well-known member
An amendum
Coz I'm a degenerate muthafucker, I completely agree and understand nobody would listen or take advise from a person who volunteer's for house arrest on a daily basis, I have to not only implore time but impress the essential requirement for everyone to gread William Maleys The Story Of The Celtic ๐Ÿ€
It is essential for everybody who even brushes across Celtic in their lives!

50 years manager of Celtic Football Club... if you don't read, you don't know, FLY THE FLAG!


GBTC๐Ÿ€
Have to add,.... I'm incredibly drunk but the book is an incredible read even tho I'm on the floor staring at the ceiling with the family calling me allsorts!

Who is Bertie Bassett anywayz??

Dafties!๐Ÿ˜Ž
 

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