St Patrick's day

#1
Just like to wish everyone a happy st paddys day. As a proud Irish man having been lucky enough to travel and experience paddys day in different countries around the world, it would be interesting to hear other people's take on it and what it means to them or maybe it means nothin to them. What does it mean to my fellow celts? Either way I'd like to hear it.
As the saying goes "there are two types of people in this world, those who are Irish, and those who wish they were Irish"!
 

boab1916

Well-known member
#3
Just like to wish everyone a happy st paddys day. As a proud Irish man having been lucky enough to travel and experience paddys day in different countries around the world, it would be interesting to hear other people's take on it and what it means to them or maybe it means nothin to them. What does it mean to my fellow celts? Either way I'd like to hear it.
As the saying goes "there are two types of people in this world, those who are Irish, and those who wish they were Irish"!
And there are those who do not need to associated with a name tag to fight for what they concieve is the rights of all nations to be free. I neither wish to be Irish , claim to be Irish or have to jump through hoops to please and pretend to be irish, for Irishness is just a name given to people who hail from an Island.
Anyhow Saint Patrick been an immigrant i am sure he did not run about attemptin to show his Irishness to all and sundry I am sure he went about his business with none of that staunchness.
"According to Patrick’s autobiographical account, known as the Confessio, when he was about sixteen years old, he was captured by Irish pirates from his home in Britain and taken as a slave to Ireland, looking after animals; by his account, he lived there for six years before escaping and returning to his family in Britain,"
 
#4
It was our equivalent of New Year growing up. It was about the only time beyond weddings and funerals that the majority of the family would get together for three days of festivities.

My Nan would roast a flock of lamb and get on the soda bread and Colcannon. There was enough drink to sink a ship and my Uncle John would ferry over with the Paddy's and poitin.

All started off civilised enough, but by nightfall the rebs had started and the scraps would break out.

Tin hats ready for Saturday, Sunday and Monday.......my Daddy's having a hooly!

Now if only we can summon the spirit of Saint Patrick to rid the snakes from Scottish football, then we can have a real party......
 

boab1916

Well-known member
#5
It was our equivalent of New Year growing up. It was about the only time beyond weddings and funerals that the majority of the family would get together for three days of festivities.

My Nan would roast a flock of lamb and get on the soda bread and Colcannon. There was enough drink to sink a ship and my Uncle John would ferry over with the Paddy's and poitin.

All started off civilised enough, but by nightfall the rebs had started and the scraps would break out.

Tin hats ready for Saturday, Sunday and Monday.......my Daddy's having a hooly!

Now if only we can summon the spirit of Saint Patrick to rid the snakes from Scottish football, then we can have a real party......
Best irish tune i ever heard on the fiddle The Masons Apron.
 
#6
And there are those who do not need to associated with a name tag to fight for what they concieve is the rights of all nations to be free. I neither wish to be Irish , claim to be Irish or have to jump through hoops to please and pretend to be irish, for Irishness is just a name given to people who hail from an Island.
Anyhow Saint Patrick been an immigrant i am sure he did not run about attemptin to show his Irishness to all and sundry I am sure he went about his business with none of that staunchness.
"According to Patrick’s autobiographical account, known as the Confessio, when he was about sixteen years old, he was captured by Irish pirates from his home in Britain and taken as a slave to Ireland, looking after animals; by his account, he lived there for six years before escaping and returning to his family in Britain,"
Fair enough, but I'm proud of my irishness and always will be. For such a small island we've populated the world. When you put up the piece on st Patrick returning to his family, maybe you should have also said where he decided to return to Ireland to serve as a bishop.
 

boab1916

Well-known member
#7
Fair enough, but I'm proud of my irishness and always will be. For such a small island we've populated the world. When you put up the piece on st Patrick returning to his family, maybe you should have also said where he decided to return to Ireland to serve as a bishop.
And good for you and maybe remember pride comes before a fall. There might be parts you will not be proud of.HH
 
#13
Go read your history irishness was spread all over many lands and on arrival some measures taking were not savoury. I am not your teacher go read for yourself its your history not mine.
I don't you to teach me Irish history. This was a light hearted thread I started and as my father used to say if you've nothin good to say sometimes it's better to say nothin!
 
#17
Not even close to been an Irish saying mate originated in Greece and translated to various sayings. Anonymous
Did someone piss on your cornflakes this mornin? It's a fuckin sayin here in Ireland. I don't give two fucks where it originated. It was meant as a joke which you have now ripped the dick out of. Fuck off and don't annoy me anymore ye fuckin dry shite!
 
#18
I'm Scottish. I was born here, raised here, schooled here, married here, divorced here, married here, divorced here, married here, divorced here (might even get married here again someday).

I work here and pay taxes here. There's much of it I despise, there is much of it I like. I identify as a Scot and my old fella and my dear departed Mother wouldn't have it any other way.

I do have dual-nationally and favour my Irish passport, as it is still in date.

However - there is a lot of shade in Irish history. Particularly how the Irish have a tendency to fuck one another over far better than any invading force ever could.

It's much better now, but there's still a bit of work to do before some of these old wounds can be healed.

I/we get called "Plastic Paddys" by the jakey-jocks. That's bad enough, but we even get called "Plastic Paddys" by the Irish who come to study here, work here, and marry here.

They don't even notice the irony of what they're saying.

I'm proud of my Irish heritage. I'm proud of the fact that Ireland is evolving and developing at a steady rate. I'm not a "Plastic Paddy" though. I'm Scots/Irish in the Southern Catholic tradition.
 
#19
I'm Scottish. I was born here, raised here, schooled here, married here, divorced here, married here, divorced here, married here, divorced here (might even get married here again someday).

I work here and pay taxes here. There's much of it I despise, there is much of it I like. I identify as a Scot and my old fella and my dear departed Mother wouldn't have it any other way.

I do have dual-nationally and favour my Irish passport, as it is still in date.

However - there is a lot of shade in Irish history. Particularly how the Irish have a tendency to fuck one another over far better than any invading force ever could.

It's much better now, but there's still a bit of work to do before some of these old wounds can be healed.

I/we get called "Plastic Paddys" by the jakey-jocks. That's bad enough, but we even get called "Plastic Paddys" by the Irish who come to study here, work here, and marry here.

They don't even notice the irony of what they're saying.

I'm proud of my Irish heritage. I'm proud of the fact that Ireland is evolving and developing at a steady rate. I'm not a "Plastic Paddy" though. I'm Scots/Irish in the Southern Catholic tradition.
Sp, I started this thread for a bit of light hearted humour. But it was hijacked by a fuckin sore sour arse who seems to have problem with me declaring my pride for being Irish. The same people who founded the great club we all seem to support. I don't like the term plastic paddy and as far as I'm concerned anyone who has a trace of Irish blood and wants to claim irishness is fine by me.
 
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