Some basic psychology football research

Fisiani

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#1

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Percept Mot Skills. 2013 Aug;117(1):1043-52.
Color of soccer goalkeepers' uniforms influences the outcome of penalty kicks.
Greenlees IA1, Eynon M2, Thelwell RC3.
Author information

Abstract
This study examined the proposition that competing against red-clad opponents hinders the performance of soccer (football) athletes. 40 experienced players took 10 penalty kicks against a goalkeeper wearing a black jersey and, 1 week later, took 10 penalty kicks against a goalkeeper wearing either a red, green, blue, or yellow jersey. Prior to each set of kicks, participants reported their expectancy of success. Players facing red-clad goalkeepers scored on fewer penalty kicks than those facing either blue- or green-clad goalkeepers, but no differences in expectancy of success emerged. The findings indicate that athletes wearing red may have an advantage over their opponents.
PMID: 24422335
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Scott Bain turned out against Sarajevo wearing black. I nearly exploded when I saw him. It's the worst possible colour to wear and would cost us several goals a year. I'd actually have the keeper wear an archery target type top.If not then, bright yellow or orange or pink or red.
 

Ray

Well-known member
#2
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Percept Mot Skills. 2013 Aug;117(1):1043-52.
Color of soccer goalkeepers' uniforms influences the outcome of penalty kicks.
Greenlees IA1, Eynon M2, Thelwell RC3.
Author information

Abstract
This study examined the proposition that competing against red-clad opponents hinders the performance of soccer (football) athletes. 40 experienced players took 10 penalty kicks against a goalkeeper wearing a black jersey and, 1 week later, took 10 penalty kicks against a goalkeeper wearing either a red, green, blue, or yellow jersey. Prior to each set of kicks, participants reported their expectancy of success. Players facing red-clad goalkeepers scored on fewer penalty kicks than those facing either blue- or green-clad goalkeepers, but no differences in expectancy of success emerged. The findings indicate that athletes wearing red may have an advantage over their opponents.
PMID: 24422335
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Scott Bain turned out against Sarajevo wearing black. I nearly exploded when I saw him. It's the worst possible colour to wear and would cost us several goals a year. I'd actually have the keeper wear an archery target type top.If not then, bright yellow or orange or pink or red.
Bring in Gok Wan,to design the top,Lol,hh
 

Fisiani

Well-known member
#7
You tend when rushed or at penalties to kick the ball at what you are looking at. Stop the anecdotal stories and learn from the evidence goalkeepers at every level should be loud in voice and jersey. Make the attacker notice you. It’s not rocket science.
 
#8
Agree with you there Fis, its not rocket science, low, hard and into a corner goal, if the colour of a keeper's jersey is putting you off maybe you shouldn't be taking the pen in the first place.

Now as a guy who trained keepers at youth level, I always told them to tell the kicker hes missing, watch his eyes when he spots the ball, never thought to throw a tin of dulux over them right enough, my bad... 😞❓😞
 

kelly

Well-known member
#10
Think the success of penaltys favours the taker rather than the keeper wearing his invincibility colours

For a start the keepers routed to the spot untill the ball is kicked ,his reaction time is slower , in his head he thinks he's quick but majority of the time he's slower than a week in jail

Then there's the guessing it's going left but it went straight down the middle

Doing study on the colours of the jersey is a bit of a piss take , who's to say most of the penalty takers during the study thought''mon we''ll blast a few for a laugh '' or the goalie thought '' gettin paid for nothing ya dancer ''

A study in the Scottish housing schemes since time began ,found that if you were pish at footie /overweight and not liked

Then you were the goalie

As Damien Duff stated only 2 weeks ago nobody likes goalies (y)
 
#11
Think the success of penaltys favours the taker rather than the keeper wearing his invincibility colours

For a start the keepers routed to the spot untill the ball is kicked ,his reaction time is slower , in his head he thinks he's quick but majority of the time he's slower than a week in jail

Then there's the guessing it's going left but it went straight down the middle

Doing study on the colours of the jersey is a bit of a piss take , who's to say most of the penalty takers during the study thought''mon we''ll blast a few for a laugh '' or the goalie thought '' gettin paid for nothing ya dancer ''

A study in the Scottish housing schemes since time began ,found that if you were pish at footie /overweight and not liked

Then you were the goalie

As Damien Duff stated only 2 weeks ago nobody likes goalies (y)
Pish at football - check
Overweight - check
Despised, loathed, hated - check.
 

Fisiani

Well-known member
#12
Sports Sci. 2010 Jul;28(9):937-46. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2010.495995.
A moving goalkeeper distracts penalty takers and impairs shooting accuracy.
Wood G1, Wilson MR.
Author information

Abstract
When facing penalty kicks in football (soccer), goalkeepers frequently incorporate strategies that are designed to distract the kicker. However, no direct empirical evidence exists to ascertain what effect such visual distractions have on the attentional control, and performance, of footballers. Eighteen experienced footballers took five penalty kicks under counterbalanced conditions of threat (low vs. high) and goalkeeper movement (stationary vs. waving arms) while wearing eye-tracking equipment. Results suggested that participants were more distracted by a moving goalkeeper than a stationary one and struggled to disengage from a moving goalkeeper under situations of high threat. Significantly, more penalties were saved on trials when the goalkeeper was moving and shots were also generally hit closer to the goalkeeper (centrally) on these trials. The results provide partial support for the predictions of attentional control theory and implications for kickers and goalkeepers are discussed.

How many more scientific studies do i have to prove my hypothesis or do we continue to ignore the science and just hope for the best. I've pointed out how to let in less goals and how to revolutionise corner kicks and no one seems to consider change from the way things have always been done.
 

Winter

Well-known member
#13
Think the success of penaltys favours the taker rather than the keeper wearing his invincibility colours

For a start the keepers routed to the spot untill the ball is kicked ,his reaction time is slower , in his head he thinks he's quick but majority of the time he's slower than a week in jail

Then there's the guessing it's going left but it went straight down the middle

Doing study on the colours of the jersey is a bit of a piss take , who's to say most of the penalty takers during the study thought''mon we''ll blast a few for a laugh '' or the goalie thought '' gettin paid for nothing ya dancer ''

A study in the Scottish housing schemes since time began ,found that if you were pish at footie /overweight and not liked

Then you were the goalie

As Damien Duff stated only 2 weeks ago nobody likes goalies (y)
There is talk of VAR being introd to ensure keepers stay on the goal line before the penalty has been taken, which they often don't. I've always been for the goalie to be wearing spandex and a red cape with a big S on his chest :p
 

kelly

Well-known member
#16
Sports Sci. 2010 Jul;28(9):937-46. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2010.495995.
A moving goalkeeper distracts penalty takers and impairs shooting accuracy.
Wood G1, Wilson MR.
Author information

Abstract
When facing penalty kicks in football (soccer), goalkeepers frequently incorporate strategies that are designed to distract the kicker. However, no direct empirical evidence exists to ascertain what effect such visual distractions have on the attentional control, and performance, of footballers. Eighteen experienced footballers took five penalty kicks under counterbalanced conditions of threat (low vs. high) and goalkeeper movement (stationary vs. waving arms) while wearing eye-tracking equipment. Results suggested that participants were more distracted by a moving goalkeeper than a stationary one and struggled to disengage from a moving goalkeeper under situations of high threat. Significantly, more penalties were saved on trials when the goalkeeper was moving and shots were also generally hit closer to the goalkeeper (centrally) on these trials. The results provide partial support for the predictions of attentional control theory and implications for kickers and goalkeepers are discussed.

How many more scientific studies do i have to prove my hypothesis or do we continue to ignore the science and just hope for the best. I've pointed out how to let in less goals and how to revolutionise corner kicks and no one seems to consider change from the way things have always been done.
Boruc was the best at this if you watch him he never settles till after the player has spotted the ball
 

kelly

Well-known member
#17
Sports Sci. 2010 Jul;28(9):937-46. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2010.495995.
A moving goalkeeper distracts penalty takers and impairs shooting accuracy.
Wood G1, Wilson MR.
Author information

Abstract
When facing penalty kicks in football (soccer), goalkeepers frequently incorporate strategies that are designed to distract the kicker. However, no direct empirical evidence exists to ascertain what effect such visual distractions have on the attentional control, and performance, of footballers. Eighteen experienced footballers took five penalty kicks under counterbalanced conditions of threat (low vs. high) and goalkeeper movement (stationary vs. waving arms) while wearing eye-tracking equipment. Results suggested that participants were more distracted by a moving goalkeeper than a stationary one and struggled to disengage from a moving goalkeeper under situations of high threat. Significantly, more penalties were saved on trials when the goalkeeper was moving and shots were also generally hit closer to the goalkeeper (centrally) on these trials. The results provide partial support for the predictions of attentional control theory and implications for kickers and goalkeepers are discussed.

How many more scientific studies do i have to prove my hypothesis or do we continue to ignore the science and just hope for the best. I've pointed out how to let in less goals and how to revolutionise corner kicks and no one seems to consider change from the way things have always been done.
Have any football associations or football clubs picked this up ?
 
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